Got The D?

G6PDd = Glucose-6-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase-deficiency

The D stands for G6PD Deficiency, the most common enzyme deficiency known to be passed on in families. In its severe form, it can cause hemolytic anemia, a premature breakdown of red blood cells which are not replenished as fast as they are destroyed. This may happen when the cells are exposed to oxidative stress triggers, in the form of – toxins, certain medications, foods or sickness. Unrecognized, the deficiency in the newborn may be fatal, while in the adult, it may cause unnecessary suffering.

The lack of this enzyme will slow down important biochemical pathways that keep one healthy.

Revised: 7-2019

Got the D?

G6PDd = Glucose-six-Phosphate-Dehydrogenase-deficiency

The D stands for a particular DEFICIENCY that everyone should learn about. G6PD Deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency known to be passed on in families. In its severe form, it can cause hemolytic anemia, a premature breakdown of red blood cells which are not replenished as fast as they are destroyed. This happens when exposed to oxidative stress triggers (toxins, medications, certain foods or sickness.) Unrecognized in the newborn  may be fatal, while in the adult may cause unnecessary suffering.

The lack of this enzyme will slow down important biochemical pathways that keep one healthy.
Symptoms of G6PDd are very similar and easily confused with other more common health issues. A G6PD deficient person may have the ability to produce enough new Red Blood Cells to compensate for the early breaking down of RBCs (low hemolysis). This is why many never realize they are deficient…until they have a major hemolytic crisis.

KNOW the signs of hemolytic anemia!

A hemolytic episode in those with G6PD Deficiency may present itself with any of the following non-specific symptoms:

In the Adult

  • Yellowing of skin and eyes (Jaundice)
  • Darker than usual urine
  • Fever, Fatigue
  • Rapid heart rate — shortness of breath
  • Confusion, lightheadedness, or dizziness
  • Back or abdominal pain
  • Heart murmur
  • Enlarged spleen or liver
  • Blue/grey fingernail color, pale skin

In the Newborn

  • Yellowing of skin and  eyes (jaundice). Severe if below the abdomen. Jaundice toxins may cause brain damage/death.
  • Darker than usual urine
  • Fever, lethargy – very sleepy, loss of appetite
  • Rapid heart rate — shortness of breath
  • Arching back movements
  • Seizures or convulsions
  • Change of normal muscle tone – loose or rigid
  • Enlarged spleen or liver
  • High-pitched cries

Get Tested

Simple blood or saliva test the can be taken to see if you are G6PD Deficient.

Anyone who is G6PD deficient can respond differently to these triggers. Most symptoms start within 24 hours or longer after exposed to a trigger. It may be best to avoid all oxidative stress G6PDd triggers.

Mothers should be careful to what they eat… breast milk can easily pass G6PDd triggers to baby.

Here are some types of foods known to be unsafe for G6PDd.  Talk to your doctor about the risks for hemolytic reactions from the foods you eat. Avoid potential oxidative stressors to stay healthy!

  • Assorted Legumes: (e.g. Fava Bean also known as Broad Bean, Windsor Bean, Horse Bean, Bell Bean, English dwarf bean, Fever bean, Haba bean, Tick bean, Pigeon bean & Silkworm bean.) Soy, Peanuts, Peas, Fenugreek and other legumes have also been noted as possible triggers.
  • Asian Herbs click here 
  • Bitter (Gourd-melon) also contains vicine which is believed to be the hemolytic agent found in the Fava Bean.
  • Synthetic(Aniline) Food dyes often found in processed foods

This list may not be complete…

Anyone who is G6PD deficient can respond differently to these triggers. Most symptoms start within 24 hours or longer after exposed to a trigger. It may be best to avoid all oxidative stress G6PDd triggers.

Mothers should be careful to what they are exposed to… breast milk can easily pass G6PDd triggers to baby.

Talk to your doctor/pharmacist about the risks for hemolytic reactions.Know the usual safe normal therapeutic medication for children/adults with G6PD Deficiency.

Medications

  • Malaria prevention drugs     Primaquine
  • Methylthioninium chloride (methylene blue) treatment for methemoglobinemia

  • Over counter salicylates medications [e.g. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), Anacin, Bufferin, Ecotrin, Empirin, Excedrin, Kaopeptade & Pepto Bismol] Best to avoid medicines that contain aspirin when sick with higher than normal fever.
  • Sulfa drugs [e.g. Sulfonamides & Sulfones (dapsone) Acne medicine [e.g. Aczone (dapsone)]
  • Urinary infection drugs [e.g. Baridium (phenazopyridine), Macrobid (nitrofurantoin), nalidixic acid & sulfamethoxazole]
  • Detoxifying agent for chemotherapy treatment [e.g. Elitek (rasburicase)]

Toxins

  • Naphthalene [e.g. mothballs]
  • Beta-Naphthol or 2-Naphthol: [e.g. Sudan dyes for coloring
    fabrics & Asian spices]
  • Camphor and mentholated products
  • Henna dyes for hair & tattoos
  • Blue dyes — Methylene (contrast dyes) & Toluidine (dental -oral and thyroid cancer screening)
  • Naphtylhydroxylamine [e.g.household drain, oven & bathroom cleaners]

There are 2 ways to kindly make a donation towards our cause:

Click here to make a donation via Paypal.

A no-fee donation can be made using Zelle. Please send Zelle donations to donations@g6pdDF.org.


AUGUST 3rd 2019

Come join us at our first awareness/fundraiser on Long Island NY. A scavenger hunt by land or sea within Babylon Village.

Go to BIT.LY/PaddlePedal to register for discount tickets.